Hemochromatosis

Friday, 13 July 2007

Hemochromatosis (pronounced: He-mo-chro-ma-toe-sis) is a genetic condition of abnormal iron metabolism that permits absorption of too much iron from an ordinary diet. Hereditary hemochromatosis is an autosomal recessive disorder. It is NOT a blood disease. It is also known as iron overload or iron storage disease. It is possible for someone who has never had an iron pill in his/her life to have iron overload. The genetic form is known as primary hemochromatosis, hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) or (HHC), or genetic hemochromatosis (GH) and idiopathic hemochromatosis (from an unknown origin), term which is rarely used anymore. The acquired form (through massive doses of iron pills or blood transfusions) is known as secondary hemochromatosis, acquired hemochromatosis, or transfusional iron overload. Frequency (incidence in the general population) of the abnormal gene is: 1 in 100-200 people has hemochromatosis (double gene mutation known as a homozygote) and 1 in 8-10 people is a carrier of hemochromatosis (single gene mutation known as a heterozygote or hetfor short). The excess iron injures body organs and KILLS unless detected in time for adequate iron storage removal. It is a very serious disease, but quite benign if detected early before organ damage has occurred. That is why routine screening is so important. HH is a lethal but treatable disease. Iron overload and storage in vital body organs can damage and may cause: Chronic Fatigue (the most common complaint by patients); Cirrhosis/Cancer of the liver (with or without a history of alcohol use) Aarthritis/joint pain Impotence/sterility/infertility; early menopause/irregular menses Hair Loss Diabetes (bronze diabetes, a darkening, graying of the skin not caused by sun exposure) Cancer (cancer thrives on iron) Abdominal pain/swelling Weight loss Frequent colds/flu/infections, compromised immune system Headaches Hypothyroidism Heart irregularities/heart failure/heart attack (especially in younger men) Cirrhosis of the liver (with or without a history of alcohol use) Hepatoma/liver cancer (the leading cause of death in HH); Premature death. Anyone with any combination of these symptoms, or a family history of these symptoms, should be tested for HH immediately. But remember, two important facts: 1.) There can be numerous generations of "silent carriers" of the mutation who never become ill and live to old age thereby giving a "false security" that HH does not "run in the family" 2.) Some patients do not have symptoms until they are end stage and their lives cannot be saved. Early detection should be achieved through: 1.) Knowledge of genetic risk through DNA Testing 2.) Annual screening with serum iron, TIBC, and serum ferritin to assure that iron storage is not taking place.

Comments

Why so many pyramids
written by Kumar , December 26, 2007

U used 10,000 pyramids in your place. It costs a lot to have so many. Even Rs. 15 per would mean Rs. 15,00,000.

How expensive is it for a flat of 2,000 sq.ft

Response from Premal Betai: You may require to contribute anywhere between Rs.2000 to Rs.5000 for a flat of 2000 square feet.

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